Piccadilly Circus - Piccadilly Circus information and pictures



The Piccadilly Circus in London is a major plaza and a traffic interchange, which is busy with tourists and shoppers. Together with Trafalgar Square and Big Ben, Piccadilly Circus makes for a postcard of the capital city.

Named after the Piccadilly Street and designed in the 1820s by John Nash, the area has always been a busy traffic junction. Handling exit traffic, Piccadilly is found at the centre of Theatreland, the main theatre district in London. The area lost its circular shape in 1886 when Shaftesbury Avenue was constructed. 4 major streets meet here Ė Regent Street, Piccadilly, Shaftesbury Avenue, and Covent Street. Regent Street is a major shopping street. Also the plaza is known for its neon signs shining with its bright colors marking it as an entrance to the cityís entertainment district.

The famous lead statue is found at the centre Ė the Angel of Christian Charity. The statue is dedicated to the child-labor abolitionist and philanthropist Lord Shaftesbury. Over the years, the statue has been mistaken for the God of Love Eros and today, it is a meeting place for thousands of tourists. The Shaftesbury memorial fountain or best known as the statue of Eros was erected here in 1892 and almost became a trademark of the city.

Trafalgar Square, Leicester Square, Chinatown, and Soho are within walking distance. Trafalgar Square is home to protests, celebrations, and the best galleries in the city. Tourists can see the Nelsonís Column at its centre Ė it was created to commemorate Admiral Nelson, 1st Duke of Bronte, who served in the Royal Navy and died at the Battle of Trafalgar. The Nelsonís Column is guarded by four lions, found at its base. Leicester Square is found east of Piccadilly Circus, at walking distance of 370 meters. There is a small park in the middle of Leicester Square, where a 19th century statue of Shakespeare has been erected. The park has four corner gates with busts, depicting the pioneer of surgery John Hunter, the Royal Academyís first president Sir Joshua Reynolds, the scientist Isaac Newton, and the painter William Hogarth. The square is also the center of cinema in the city, and it has been claimed that the cinema with the most seats and the cinema with the largest screen are found here.

Soho is also close nearby, famous for its excellent bars and lively nightlife. Soho Square is found at the northern end, and this is where many workers have their lunch, with people lazing in the sun and having picnics on weekends and summer days. While Soho had a reputation for being a sex industry venue in the past, today it is a fashionable district with media offices and upmarket restaurants. Chinatown is another place to see if you visit the Piccadilly Circus. Part of the Soho area, Chinatown offers a huge range of restaurants, bars, shops, and courses. Among the many Chinese businesses here are Chinese restaurants, bakeries, souvenir shops, and supermarkets. The Mid Autumn Festival takes place here, with lion dancers on stage, celebrations, and traditional Chinese dishes. This is one of the most colorful and biggest events, with restaurants and shops welcoming visitors to enjoy the rest of the day with them.

How to get to Piccadilly Circus: Subway - Piccadilly and Bakerloo lines to Piccadilly Circus station.
Piccadilly Circus London

Piccadilly Circus, Eros, London
Piccadilly Circus, Eros, London


Piccadilly Circus, Regent Street, London
Piccadilly Circus, Regent Street, London


Piccadilly Circus London
Piccadilly Circus London


Piccadilly Circus, Regent Street, London
Piccadilly Circus, Regent Street, London




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User Comments about Piccadilly Circus



gigi says:
Piccadilly Circus is probably the busiest place in London. A must see also. At night it is so crowded that you can't cross it without an elbow fight. I don't know how the double-deckers and cabs navigate through its crowds.